Queenstown Memorial Animation

Hi, just a quick post between many other things to show off a bit of 3D animation done recently to visualize a 10m tall sculpture proposed for a Park in Queenstown, Tasmania.

Proposed to commemorate a disaster which claimed 43 miners lives in 1912.

For the 3D enthusiasts out there, all work was done in Lightwave 11, it was my first test of using the new instancing feature in that software. Compositing and polish in After Effects.

Ignite Your Imagination TVC

Here’s a bit of TV Commercial animation I did for the launch of the University of Tasmania’s science events and info website: Ignite Your Imagination

Andrew from Atomic Blender supplied the storyboards, direction and 2D assets which I then modified and animated. Additional assets were built and animated in 3D. One of the nicest things was that I used multiple kinds of animation, and a whole bunch of software.

The sound effects were created by Nick Storr at Firefly Media.

The animation was then used again on the website via the talents of Matt Daniels who transformed it into a navigation element.

This project was the best kind, lots of fun and people paid me at the end!
Software used: Photoshop, Flash, After Effects, Lightwave 3D.

The Long Beach: a short animated film

It’s about time I released this film into the wilds of the internet.

Made by the talented Mauricio Milne-Jones and myself in 2006 and based on a short story and script by Helen van Rooijen (good on ya Mum!).

The original short story had no dialogue in it and I wanted to keep it that way to reach a wider audience and allow the narrative to come from the actions of the characters. It seemed more elegant that way.

It’s definitely one to relax and watch with a glass of red, weighing in at almost 12 minutes it’s a long short! While it’s not ‘arty’ by any stretch of the imagination it does ask you to put things together a bit.

It did ok at festivals for a long sentimental film that asks the audience to think a bit, if it were a short punchy comedy it would have done much better!

A big thanks to everyone who contributed, Alicia, Duncan, Matt D, Grace, Nando, Nina, the use of facilities at Blue Rocket Productions (and you David G!). Plus some helpful advice from Adam.

For those to whom like to know these things, made using 3DS Max, Lightwave and a bunch of Adobe products!

Oh, and if you see this broadcast on TV in the USA, let me know, I’d love to know who the distributor is so I can kick their backsides!

Some Tin Dragon Animation

I can finally post some of the animation done for the Tin Dragon project, an installation with a short film component housed in St. Helens, Tasmania. The project is about the Chinese Tin Miners who came to Tasmania in the 19th Century. The Dragon comes along for the ride.

This animation was a proof of concept which doesn’t appear in the final film. The landscape was a still photo, which I separated out the sky and painted in some more clouds so I could make them move subtly.

The project was developed by Virtual Reality Entertainment Systems and the soundtrack for this clip was created by George Goerss of Sonic Solutions.

Chinese Dragon spotted in the Mountains of Tasmania

Hi, just a quick post with a couple of frames from a test animation of the Chinese Dragon flying over Mt. Cameron in the North of Tasmania. The original photo was taken by Julie Martin who’s also running the project.

I was hoping to add some camera movement to the shot but time restrictions and tight framing of the original photo conspired to make it static except for a bit of camera shake as the dragon flies over. Instead I made sure the Dragon cast shadows on the mountain, a bit more important selling the shot.

I did have time to cut out and paint in some extra sky so I could make the clouds move, which for some reason I found really fun.. go figure. All the preparation work paid off as I turned the shot around in a day, nice.

So, animated in PMG Messiah, rendered in Lightwave and final processing in After Effects. Matte work in Photoshop.

Stay tuned, soon another episode of the adventures of Prehistoric TV Reconstruction Kitteh.

Chinese Dragon #4: ZBrush Setup, Layers

I was going to discuss ZBrush sculpting in this post, but I realised there might be some value in covering a little more about set up and preparing for export.

So I’d exported my base mesh as an obj. file from Lightwave and followed the steps in Steve Warner’s guide here pretty closely, as ZBrush doesn’t follow any of the standard windows conventions for just about any operation!

For the uninitiated, it can be a pretty daunting interface.

Saying that, once you go through the process a couple of times it becomes second nature, and you quickly get into sculpting which is quite intuitive.

ZBrush does all of its work by subdividing the bejingers out of your mesh, so the more detail you want, the more polygons you need to let it use. It has a pretty impressive capacity to deal with millions of polys, and it sets a limit based on your system’s capabilities which is really helpful.(going beyond it results in instability)

Thanks to Bump and Normal mapping when you export your work for rendering the detail can be managed more easily. I’m a big fan of Normal mapping, which gives a serious illusion of depth without needing any additional polygons. I haven’t looked into it too much but the only drawback is the maps aren’t exactly editable, using multiple colours to express depth:

ZBrush allows you to sculpt in non-destructive layers. Just like Photoshop you can turn layers on and off, or use them to try things out without messing stuff up.

The other thing that is nice about this is that you can turn them on and off to export different maps in different ways. So if you plan a little you can make things easier when you return to your output software.

And finally, because the rest of the post has been dry and technical here’s a pretty picture!

Chinese Dragon #3: ZBrush UV Mapping, do as I say not as I do…Msp

I looked at a couple of different ways to UV map the Chinese Dragon, though I was pretty keen to use ZBrush’s native mapper as I’d heard good things about it and I was keen to just get on with it.

The up side is it produces virtually distortion free UV maps at the push of a button, letting you get on with the artistic stuff.

The down side of this is that it produces maps that are difficult to work out if you want to edit them in Photoshop, with very few contiguous bits for easy painting. They look a little something like this:

Yup, blocky blockness! It’s great for use in ZBrush, where you don’t work directly with it at all really, not so hot if you want to tweak somewhere else.

The other thing you might notice is there’s a fair bit of empty space. ZBrush does its best to optimize, but when you’re making a very large map(4096 pixels square) every pixel counts. Especially if your dragon is 35m long and will have close ups!

ZBrush Tip: It’s worthwhile exporting your model with it’s new UV Map to see if you can make better use of the map real estate in your destination software before starting to sculpt in ZBrush.(even if I didn’t, *you* should!)

ZBrush also has a plugin UV mapper called UV Master which offers some very nice features, the standout being the ability to paint directly onto you model to define map regions and areas of higher detail. It’s also artist friendly in that the maps it produces are more recognisable. I gave it a spin for the mapping of my Dragon’s horns and even with the default settings gave quite nice results.

Chinese Dragon WIP

Here’s a little beauty shot of the Chinese Dragon I’m working on at the moment.

One of the big pleasures of this gig so far has been using Lightwave for rendering. It’s happily taken as many polygons as I can throw at it, displacement and radiosity all in it’s stride. There have been issues getting the displacement working nicely, but I think much of that has been due to a lack of documentation rather than tools.

My client wants a few changes so I’ll be busy applying those, as well as fiddling the rig in Messiah.

Esoteric Messiah Tip: I’ve found making the extra effort of using CycleBranchMorph expressions for slider posing instead of the Motionblender Effect gives better results, as well as allowing you to start animating on frame 0.

A big thanks to Julie(my client) for allowing me to blog this guy.

Chinese Dragons and the Great Software Wrangle!

It’s been a bit quiet here while I’ve been tangled up in other projects. Thankfully one of my clients has been kind enough to let me show off the work I’ve been doing with them.

The project is for an exhibit in Northern Tasmania to do with the Chinese Tin Miners who migrated there in the 1800’s. The exhibit uses animation and live action to tell a story around some of the migrants.

Among other things, I get to make a 3D animated Chinese ‘Tin’ Dragon.

I’m using 3 separate pieces of software, Lightwave, PMG Messiah and ZBrush. The process of getting those three working together has been a long one for me, as often you need to do some digging to find what you need to know and it was my first time using ZBrush.

So it goes a little something like this, initial modeling in Lightwave, rigging and animation in PMG Messiah, Texturing and additional detail modeling in ZBrush, final surfacing and rendering in Lightwave.

I’d sat on my copy of ZBrush for quite a while waiting for the opportunity to use it, never finding the time between other projects to play. I really regret that now as it’s the best thing since sliced bread.

ZBrush lets you take your low detailed 3D model and make it a highly detailed sculpture, which you can then export for animation etc. The interface is a little alienating at first, as it doesn’t follow the standard Windows way of working. I found this excellent guide by Steve Warner for getting Lightwave objects into and out of ZBrush, as well as how to get started in ZBrush itself. It’s a little out of date though, and I found I had to trawl both the ZBrush and lightwave forums to discover that some things had been streamlined and actually work better now.

Couple of tips….

Tip#1: Ensure your starting mesh has enough density to support the detail you create in ZBrush, even in places where you would usually reduce polygons for reasons of economy.

Tip#2: Install all the ZBrush plugins, they’re free and add some amazing capabilities to the arsenal, like being able to paint on a ZBrush ‘screen grab’ in Photoshop, then apply that painting in ZBrush.

ZBrush itself makes 3D modeling feel like sculpting and painting, it’s no wonder it’s become so popular.

So in the end I was able to go from the initial Lightwave model…


To this…

While we worked from statues and illustrations of Chinese Dragons, an important factor for me was to ensure it is a living animal. I took the view that the Chinese paintings and sculptures were an interpretation of reality, as if the artist had seen a Dragon and then tried to paint or sculpt what they’d seen flying past and the best we were getting was brief eye witness sightings. Otherwise I would just be making a moving statue, or a cartoon.

My paleoart dabblings led me to do things like add a caudofemoralis muscle, as well as ensuring as much of the anatomy as possible made sense and worked.

That’ll do for now, I’ll be back with a bit more on this project soon!

PS: I’m not sure how much technical information people might want about this process, so if you’re interested in knowing more pop me a question in the comments.